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Joyce. Veinte años. Estudiante de la Universidad de Puerto Rico. Leo mucho, sueño despierta aún más. Soy antropóloga en proceso; soy un work-in-progress, soy un bosquejo mal hecho.

Vomito ideas y maltrato mi ego aquí. Conoce a los renegados aquí.

Seeing others, too, absorbed in their reading, holding up or pressing down on different-looking books, some intimidating in their appearance, others inviting, makes one a participant in one of the oldest and most noble human activities. Yes, reading books is a slow, time-consuming, and often tedious process. In comparison, surfing the Internet is a quick, distracting activity in which one searches for a specific subject, finds it, and then reads about it—often by skipping a great deal of material and absorbing only pertinent fragments. Books require patience, sustained attention to what is on the page, and frequent rest periods for reverie, so that the meaning of what we are reading settles in and makes its full impact.
written by Charles Simic, “A Country Without Libraries”, New York Review of Books Blog (via paradoxicalsentiments)

(Source: curator-of-curiosities, via paradoxicalsentiments)

venetians:

Photo09_5A (by For the easily distracted…)
We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.
written by Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty  (via commovente)

(Source: eatthedamncake.com, via awriterandnothingelse)

bofransson:

Helena with flowers
Stanislaw Wyspianski - 1902
I think we are well-advised to keep on nodding terms with the people we used to be, whether we find them attractive company or not. Otherwise they turn up unannounced and surprise us, come hammering on the mind’s door at 4 a.m. of a bad night and demand to know who deserted them, who betrayed them, who is going to make amends. We forget all too soon the things we thought we could never forget. We forget the loves and the betrayals alike, forget what we whispered and what we screamed, forget who we were.
written by Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem (via paradoxicalsentiments)

(Source: larmoyante, via paradoxicalsentiments)

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”
RIP Gabriel García Márquez
I am interested in the non-dramatic moments in life. I’m not at all attracted to making films that are about drama. A few years back, I saw a biopic about a famous American abstract expressionist artist. And you know what? It really horrified me. All they did was reduce his life to the big dramatic moments you could pick out of any biography. If that’s supposed to be a portrait of somebody, I just don’t get it. It’s so reductive. It just seems all wrong to me.
written by Jim Jarmusch (via paradoxicalsentiments)

(Source: gillamvan-gelder, via paradoxicalsentiments)

virare:

Red October
Holly Rose Emery by Chad Moore for Out of Order Fall/Winter 13-14
People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her.
written by Sophie Turner, in response to Sansa hate (x)

(Source: beyonslays, via futurospekcja)